What Burnout Really Is And How To Deal With It

Burnout has become a bit of a fashion statement like stress used to be used before and depression is used today.  These words get thrown around in order to get sympathy from people without any real understanding what the original term means.  Overstating what is happening with us has a real impact on us physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.  If you are going to overuse negatively impacting words then your language is going to become a detriment to your success and you need to keep it in check.

So first, let’s take a look at what burnout actually means rather than how it is used.

Burnout is the state reached when there is no more fuel left


Looking at what it means it is easy to see how people can overuse it and attach it to things which aren’t so detrimental.  Normally when people say it they mean any of the following:

  • Feeling tired
  • Not feeling motivated
  • Don’t know what to do next
  • Feeling like they’ve run out of options
  • Business is struggling
  • They’re struggling
  • Making unhealthy choices leading to tiredness
  • Not sleeping enough
  • And the list goes on

So if you or someone you know starts talking about burnout or how they are feeling burned out then cast your mind back to the list you’ve just read.  Could it be described better by one or several things you’ve read on the list?  Quite often I hear people classifying things the wrong way.  They don’t think about how it is impacting them and also the people around them.  Talking in a negative way regularly and being over the top with the level of negativity that you’re experiencing has an effect on the people that are around you most.

How To Deal With Burnout

add-fuel-to-avoid-burnoutLet’s take a look at the meaning of burnout again.  It is the end of a fuel supply.  There is simply no fuel left.  So what can be done about that?

Simply, the answer is to add more fuel.

That’s it.  No honestly it is as simple as that.

What is it that fuels you?  Why are you doing what you are doing?  Do you have bills to pay?

 

  • How much do you need to earn today to be able to pay those bills?
  • What can you do to earn the amount of money you need today?
  • Thinking about how you will feel knowing that you have covered your bills today, bring that feeling to making calls or whatever it is that you need to do.
  • Get that fuel inside of you before you pick up the phone

Once you’ve been able to pay your bills, you are into the zone of “What else do I want to bring money in for?”  Maybe you are wanting to

  • get a new car
  • buy some new clothes
  • redecorate a room in your house
  • pay for a wedding
  • buy a gift for someone you care about
  • have more money to give to a charity you like

Get into that zone next and bring that feeling to your work.  How much of an impact will that bring to what you need to do?

Once that fuel starts to disappear ask yourself

What is it that I want next?


By checking in with yourself like this you are giving yourself the fuel that you need to keep going.  The fuel source that you need can change many times throughout the day.  Oh and don’t be trying to put fuel in that you think you should want rather than what you actually do want.  That isn’t going to motivate you enough.  If what you really want is a gold Rolex covered in diamonds, don’t pretend that you are want to do something spiritual with your money.  Get the Rolex if that is what motivates you the most and once you have it the spiritual thing might be the next big motivator.  You have to do things in the right order and not what you want others to see you doing while pretending to have different urges and motivations.  People can see right through that anyway so just be honest with yourself.

So go ahead and get yourself fuelled up and then get the work done.

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